Gaz Coombes tells fans not to expect new Supergrass music

Gaz Coombes has told Supergrass fans not to expect any new music from them just yet.

The Britpop legends – completed by Danny Goffey, Mick Quinn and Rob Coombes – will head out on tour for the first time since their "f***ing painful" 2010 split in February, and will also release a career-spanning ‘Best Of’ LP, ‘Supergrass: The Strange Ones 1994 – 2008’ on January 24, to mark the 25th anniversary of their seminal chart-topping debut album, ‘I Should Coco’.

However, the frontman has admitted he and his bandmates have no plans to enter the studio to work on a follow-up to 2008’s ‘Diamond Hoo Ha’, whilst he confessed he found the demise of the group, who split after they shelved their seventh record, really difficult.

He told the latest issue of Q Magazine: "We needed that distance of time to forget some of the shit and pain at the end. It was f***ing painful. I needed 10 years."

On whether the ‘Caught By The Fuzz’ rockers will work on new tunes, he replied: "I don’t want to rule anything out but that’s not part of it.

"It’s just this one year I’m up for, doing these gigs."

Gaz also admitted he felt "responsible" for their split and explained that their lengthy hiatus largely came down to feeling "uninspired" with the album they were working on.

He told the publication: "I remember feeling uninspired.

"You’d take CDs with you on your journey home and it was the first time I’d never play them to anyone, which was weird.

"I was trying to be optimistic, thinking that they weren’t ready, but I just wasn’t digging it. I just felt quite sad about it, really."

The 43-year-old musician admitted it felt "horrible and demoralising" when they showed what they had to a record label and insisted he had never intended to start a solo career.

He also revealed that he felt like he had a "weight" lifted off his shoulders when they decided to go their separate ways.

He added: "We played them two or three tracks and I was sitting there thinking: ‘These aren’t very good.’

"It just felt horrible and demoralising. It was painful and I didn’t see a way out apart from leaving the band.

"I felt responsible. I didn’t want to f*** things up for anyone else. "But once I’d decided to leave, I felt really good, that weight had gone.

"I had no thoughts about doing any music on my own, I just wanted to not have that feeling with music before it got too much and did any damage."

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